Comment on ‘Psychological distress in patients with cancer: is screening the effective solution?'

Auteurs
J Dekker, A.T.F. (Aartjan) Beekman, A.D. Boenink, H Bomhof-Roordink, A.M. Braamse, E.H. Collette, P.C. Huijgens, M.H.M. van der Linden, Berno van Meijel, F.J. Snoek, O Visser en H.M. Verheul
Lectoraat
Soort object
Artikel
Datum
2013
Samenvatting
Screening for psychological distress in patients with cancer is currently being debated in the British Journal of Cancer. Screening has been recommended, as elevated levels of distress have been consistently observed and clinicians tend to overlook the need of psychological support (Carlson et al, 2012; Carlson et al, 2013; National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 2013). On the other hand, it has been argued that screening should not be implemented, as the true benefit of screening and subsequent treatment of psychological distress is far from being definitively proven (Coyne, 2013). Recent findings on human resilience in the face of potentially traumatic events (PTEs) provide a new perspective on detecting and treating psychological distress in patients with cancer. Humans show strong resilience in the face of potentially traumatic events, such as cancer diagnosis and treatment (Bonanno et al, 2011). This observation leads us to propose two alternative approaches towards detecting and treating psychological distress in patients with cancer: ‘screening for psychological distress’ and ‘supporting resilience and case finding’.